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Yusuf Hamied Department of Chemistry

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Read more at: Single-step catalysis platform speeds drug discovery

Single-step catalysis platform speeds drug discovery

hands wearing protective gloves handling an instrument

PhD student Yusra Abdelhamid working in the lab, courtesy Gaunt group

Researchers here have developed a single-step method to synthesise a molecular structure important in drug discovery, which will dramatically speed the search for new drug therapies for pain, neurological disorders and opioid addiction.

Read more at: New strategy enables better understanding of complex materials

New strategy enables better understanding of complex materials

Image of Dr Christoph Schran sitting at his desk

Dr Christoph Schran at his desk, courtesy ICE group

A new strategy to enable molecular simulations of complex systems has opened the door to a better understanding of complex materials.

Read more at: Cambridge researchers receive Breakthrough Prize

Cambridge researchers receive Breakthrough Prize

Photo courtesy Millennium Technology Prize

Professors Shankar Balasubramanian and David Klenerman have been awarded the 2022 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences - the world's largest science prize.

Read more at: Climate scientist recognised for outstanding research

Climate scientist recognised for outstanding research

Dr Anja Schmidt, courtesy Gabriella Bocchetti

Dr Anja Schmidt has been recognised by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) for significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by an outstanding early career scientist.

Read more at: Nano ‘camera’ made using molecular glue allows real-time monitoring of chemical reactions

Nano ‘camera’ made using molecular glue allows real-time monitoring of chemical reactions

Head and shoulders of Professor Oren Scherman wearing blue shirt looking at camera

Professor Oren Scherman courtesy Chemistry Photography

Researchers here have made a tiny camera, held together with ‘molecular glue’ that allows them to observe chemical reactions in real time.

Read more at: Edible hydrogels could replace some plastics

Edible hydrogels could replace some plastics

Hydrogels in plastic tubes with iridescent colours

Edible hydrogels, courtesy C. Barty-King

Researchers here have found a way to make a sustainable, edible cellulose gel that changes colour when you press it.